AsiaMag | UNESCO World Heritage List

UNESCO World Heritage List

The UNESCO world heritage of humanity just add 2 new Asian sites on his list.

Kofun of Mozu-Furuichi in Japan

After the temples and shrines of Nikko, the villages of Shirakawa-go and Gokayama, or Mount Fuji, Japan now has a 23rd UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Officially registered under the name of “Kofun of Mozu-Furuichi: funeral mounds of ancient Japan”. This property, located in the plains of Osaka, includes 49 kofun (“old mounds” in Japanese).

Kofun can take the form of “keyholes”, scallops, squares or circles. These places of burial members of the elite, conceal funerary objects (weapons, armor, decorations). They were decorated with clay sculptures, the haniwa, which can take the form of cylinders or figurative forms (houses, tools, weapons, human silhouettes …).

The selected kofun, form the richest material representation of the Kofun period, from the third to the sixth century of our era. They illustrate the differences of social class of this time and testify to a very sophisticated funerary system. These burial places are therefore of major importance in the history of Japan since the period from about 250 to 538 has taken the name of kofun.

The most impressive of these kofun is unquestionably the Kofun Daisenryō located in Sakai near Osaka. The place surrounded by several moats extends over 840 meters long and 300 meters wide. It would house the burial place of Emperor Nintoku and be the largest grave in the world. Its access is strictly forbidden and almost no excavations have been carried out there since 1500 years.

Archaeological Ruins of Liangzhu City in China

The archaeological ruins of Liangzhu City were the center of power and belief of an ancient regional state within the perimeter of the Taihu Lake area.

It is located in the plain of river networks in the eastern foothills of the Tianmu Mountains in the Yangtze River Delta on China’s southeastern coast.

The property consists of four areas: the Yaoshan site area, the upper dam area at the mouth of the valley, the lower dam area in the plain facing the mountains and the area of ​​the city site.

The archaeological ruins of Liangzhu City reveal a former regional state based economically on rice cultivation, characterized by social differentiation and a unified belief system, which existed in late Neolithic times in China.

With a series of sites, including the site of the city built between 3300 and 2300 BC. AD, the surrounding water conservation system with its complex functions and cemeteries of different social ranks (with an altar), and the exhumed objects represented by a series of jade artifacts symbolizing the system of belief, as well as its ancient date, the good represents the remarkable contributions of the Yangtze River basin to the origins of Chinese civilization.

In addition, the configuration and functional zoning of the capital, as well as the characteristics of the Liangzhu culture and the outer city with its terraces, strongly support the value of the property.

These ruins are an outstanding example of an ancient urban civilization, including land monuments, urban planning, a water conservation system and a social hierarchy that translates into the differentiation of burials.

The archaeological ruins of Liangzhu City were the center of power and belief of an ancient regional state within the perimeter of the Taihu Lake area. It is located in the plain of river networks in the eastern foothills of the Tianmu Mountains in the Yangtze River Delta on China’s southeastern coast.